The role of the community nurse in integrated end of life care

This learning module has been accredited by the Royal College of Nursing and was last updated in 2016.

All modules are subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software.

Duration: 01:00:00 Type: CPD modules Level: Qualified Nurses

Authors

Annette Thomas-Gregory, Acting head of department, Anglia Ruskin University, faculty of health, social care and education, Cambridge.
Isabel Richmond, Lecturer, St Helena Hospice, Colchester.


Short description

This module explores the main factors that affect end of life care provision in the community. It suggests ways in which community practitioners can develop their skills in this important area of care provision.


Detailed description

Although some people receive excellent care at the end of their lives, many do not. Services are not always well co-ordinated and communication between staff and agencies can break down. In recent years, new models of care have been developed to deliver good integrated care to more patients, including those receiving palliative care in community settings. Integrated care models need to be flexible and supported by clear, well-considered protocols and policies. When there is poor co-ordination, the consequences can have a devastating effect on individuals and their families. A well-resourced multidisciplinary approach is fundamental to ensuring the provision of good integrated care. This module provides an understanding of the main factors that affect end of life care provision in the community by focusing on the end of life care strategy, the national gold standards framework and the ongoing integrated and collaborative care policy initiatives. It suggests ways in which community practitioners can develop their skills in providing care for people at the end of their lives.

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